Film Noir and Neo Noir on TCM: March 2017

*All times are PST. Please check the Turner Classics Movie website to confirm dates and times or additional programming information.

Wednesday, March 1, 7:00 PM

VERTIGO (1958): An old friend hires ex-cop Scotty (Jimmy Stewart) to follow his beautiful but emotionally disturbed wife (Kim Novak) through the gorgeously shot streets of San Francisco. Stewart gives an intensely dark performance as Scotty spirals further and further into romantic obsession. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

Thursday, March 2, 4:45 AM

WAIT UNTIL DARK 1967): A commercial artist unknowingly brings a stash of heroin into his home. A trio of bad guys (Richard Crenna, Jack Weston and Alan Arkin) trace the dope to him. They trick him into leaving the house, but, unfortunately, his blind wife (Audrey Hepburn) is there alone. They proceed to first try to trick and then to terrorize her while she tries to figure out how to turn the tables on her unknown assailants. Hepburn earned an Oscar nomination for Best Actress for her remarkable performance. Adapted from the Broadway hit written by Fredrick Knott and directed by Arthur Penn. Dir. Terence Young

Thursday, March 2, 8:00 PM

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE? (1962) A crazed, aging star (Bette Davis) torments her sister (Joan Crawford) in a decaying Hollywood mansion. This beautiful Hollywood gothic noir features a duet of superbly fearless performances by two legendary actresses. Nominated for five Oscars, but only one win, Best Costume Design, Black-and-White for Norma Koch Dir. Robert Aldrich

Saturday, March 4, 7:15 PM

FAMILY PLOT (1976): Lighthearted suspense film about a phony psychic/con artist and her taxi driver/private investigator boyfriend who encounter a pair of serial kidnappers while trailing a missing heir in California. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

NOIR ALLEY

Sunday, March 5, 7:00 AM

FNF Prez Eddie Muller presents

THE MALTESE FALCON (1941): How do I love this movie, let me count the ways… In arguably the first, and greatest, film noir, hard-boiled detective Sam Spade (Humphrey Bogart) gets caught up in the deadly search for a priceless statue. Along the way he tangles with a murderous liar (Mary Astor), a foppish thug (Peter Lorre) and an obese mastermind (Sydney Greenstreet). Director John Huston brilliantly adapted it from the Dashiell Hammett novel and earned an Oscar nomination for Best Writing, Screenplay. The film also garnered nominations for Best Picture and for Sydney Greenstreet, in his film debut, Best Actor in a Supporting Role. Dir. John Huston

Sunday, March 5, 9:00 AM

SABOTEUR (1941): Aircraft factory worker Barry Kane (Robert Cummings) goes on the run across the United States when he is wrongly accused of starting a fire that killed his best friend. He finds love along the way with a girl (Priscilla Lane) who's positive he's guilty. Can he clear himself and win her love? The film is full of quirky touches (my favorite an abductee is charged for a milkshake by her captors), unusual supporting characters (Norman Lloyd and Otto Kruger among others), and some outstanding set pieces, including the famous Statue of Liberty finale. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

Tuesday, March 7, 11:00 AM

EAST SIDE WEST SIDE (1949) Wealthy and married Jessie Bourne (Barbara Stanwyck) finds herself attracted to ex-police officer turned author Mark Dwyer (Van Heflin), but wants to remain loyal to her husband (James Mason). Unfortunately he's playing around with his ex-flame Isabel (Ava Gardner). Isabel tells Jessie that she has every intention of taking away her husband. Shortly afterwards, Isabel winds up dead and Jessie falls under suspicion for the murder. Low rent noir goddess Beverly Michaels does a wonderful turn a trashy gun moll in a small but pivotal role. Dir. Mervyn LeRoy

Wednesday, March 8, 1:15 PM

PARTY GIRL (1958): Don't miss this great Nick Ray film, not available on DVD, a gritty bringing down the racket story featuring an interesting love story between a beautiful showgirl (Cyd Charisse) and a gangster's mouthpiece (Robert Taylor) set in Chicago during the mob infested nineteen twenties. See if you can see spot the scene Brian De Palma stole for The Untouchables. Dir. Nicholas Ray

Friday, March 10, 3:00 AM

MURDER, MY SWEET (1944): The film that graduated Dick Powell from romantic musical lead to noir tough guy. Raymond Chandler's detective and knight errant, Philip Marlowe's (Powell) search for a singer name Velma, leads him through a tangled web of blackmail and murder. Along the way, he finds himself embroiled with a wealthy man's unscrupulous gold-digging wife (Claire Trevor) and the step-daughter that despises her (Anne Shirley). Mike Mazurki gives a standout performance as the mentally challenged and extremely physically powerful ex-con that hires Marlowe to find Velma. "Cute as pants." Dir. Edward Dmytryk

Friday, March 10, 6:15 AM

HARPER (1966): In this neo-noir, soon to be divorced private eye (Paul Newman) sets out to find the missing millionaire husband for his crippled wife (Lauren Bacall). The trail leads to a religious cult and a kidnapping plot. His investigation also leads him to Shelley Winters as a faded starlet. Janet Leigh plays his estranged wife whom Harper still loves. Dir. Jack Smight

Friday, March 10, 3:00 AM

THE THIN MAN (1934): Dashiell Hammett's urbane but fun loving sleuths Nick and Nora Charles, along with their pup Asta, investigate the disappearance of an inventor in this classic blend of laughs and suspense. Shot in just two weeks by director Woody "One-Shot'' Van Dyke and cinematographer James Wong Howe, this gem set the gold standard for the sophisticated comedy—inspiring five sequels as well as countless inferior imitations. Van Dyke previously directed Myrna Loy and William Powell in Manhattan Melodrama and spotted the terrific chemistry of their off screen banter between takes. He insisted on casting the pair as Hammett's hard-drinking super-couple and the glamorous pair became one of the movies' great romantic teams. Shot by the legendary cinematographer James Wong Howe. The film garnered four Oscar nominations, Best Picture, Best Actor in a Leading Role for Powell, Best Director for W.S. Van Dyke Best Writing, Adaptation for Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett. Dir. Woody Van Dyke

Friday, March 10, 10:15 AM

BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK (1955): A one-armed veteran (Spencer Tracy) uncovers small-town secrets when he tries to visit an Asian-American war hero's family. Noir icon Robert Ryan shines as the bigoted boss of the town. This film earned 3 Oscar nominations: Spencer Tracy for Best Actor in a Leading Role; John Sturges for Best Director; and Best Writing, Screenplay for Millard Kaufman. Dir. John Sturges

Friday, March 10, 1:3:0 PM

LADY IN THE LAKE (1947): A lady editor (Audrey Totter) hires Phillip Marlowe to investigate the disappearance of her boss' wife. First time director Robert Montgomery, who also starred as Marlowe, chose to shoot the entire film from Marlowe's POV using a subjective camera in order to replicate visually Raymond Chandler's first person narrative from the novel. Dir. Robert Montg

Friday, March 10, 3:30 PM

ROPE (1948): Two wealthy and louche pseudo-intellectuals (John Dahl and Farley Granger) murder a friend in a Nietzschean demonstration of will and folly. Then they throw a party inviting the victim's friends, family and their old school teacher (Jimmy Stewart) who begins to suspect something odd when the guest of honor doesn't arrive for his own party. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

NOIR ALLEY

Sunday, March 12, 7:00 AM

FNF Prez Eddie Muller presents

DETOUR (1946): A hitchhiker (Tom Neal) takes on a dead man's identity only to face blackmail by an unscrupulous woman (Ann Savage) — possibly the meanest woman in the history of cinema. Dir. Edgar G. Ulmer

Tuesday, March 14, 5:00 PM—11:00 PM

Guest Programmer and Crime Novelist Michael Connelly Picks Three
Neo-Noirs

5:00 PM

KLUTE (1971) Small town detective John Klute (Donald Sutherland) journeys to the Big Apple to search for a missing friend. He has only one lead: an obscene letter from the man to New York City prostitute Bree Daniels (Jane Fonda). He unravels both the mystery of the missing man and of the call girl. Fonda won a well-deserved Best Actress Oscar for her portrayal of the disturbed and disturbing Bree. Dir. Alan J. Pakula

7:00 PM

THE FRENCH CONNECTION (1972): New York Detectives, Jimmy "Popeye" Doyle (Gene Hackman) and Buddy Russo (Roy Scheider) attempt to intercept a massive heroin shipment coming into the city and hunt down the criminal mastermind behind it, Alain Charnier (Fernando Rey). This gritty procedural also features one of the best car chases in cinematic history. In addition to earning Best Picture and Best Actor for Hackman at the Oscars, the film won Best Director for Friedkin, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Editing. Dir. William Friedkin

9:00 PM

NIGHT MOVES (1975): An aging actress hires football player turned P.I. Harry (Gene Hackman) to find her sexually precocious teenager daughter (Melanie Griffith). He traces her to Florida where he also finds trouble in the shape of a beautiful woman (Jennifer Warren) and a criminal conspiracy. Dir. Arthur Penn

Wed., March 15, 3:00 AM—5:00 PM

TCM Film Noir Marathon

Call in sick and unplug your phone

3:00 AM

THE WOMAN ON THE BEACH (1947): A shell shocked coastguardsman (Robert Ryan) falls for a married woman (Joan Bennett) trapped in a loveless marriage to a renowned artist that she accidently blinded during a drunken fight. He begins to suspect that her husband (Charles Bickford) may actually be able to see. Dir. Jean Renoir

4:30 AM

TOO LATE FOR TEARS (1949): For many years, all 35mm prints of Too Late for Tears (1949) were believed lost, but through the determined efforts of the Film Noir Foundation, sufficient original material has been discovered to enable a restoration, performed under the auspices of the UCLA Film & Television Archive. Based on a novel by future television titan Roy Huggins, and featuring Huggins' own brilliant screenplay, the film is a neglected masterpiece of noir, awaiting rediscovery. A suburban housewife (Lizabeth Scott) decides to keep a satchel of money accidentally tossed into her convertible, against the wishes of her husband (Van Heflin). Dan Duryea plays the intended recipient of the cash and he's not into sharing. The result? Mayhem and murder. Dir. Byron Haskin

6:15 AM

OUT OF THE PAST (1947): In this quintessential film noir, small town gas station owner Jeff Bailey's (Robert Mitchum) past catches up with him when a stranger passing through town recognizes him. He tells his girlfriend Ann Miller (Virginia Huston) about his previous via flashback, of course. Jeff was a private eye falls for the gangster's moll (Jane Greer) that he's supposed to find for her lover Whit Sterling (Kirk Douglas). She's allegedly stolen $40,000 from Whit and he wants her and the dough back. As in all good noirs, nothing is really as it seems. Watch for future noir siren Rhonda Fleming as a duplicitous secretary. Based on Geoffrey Homes' excellent pulp novel Build My Gallows High and shot by legendary cinematographer Nicholas Musuraca. Dir. Jacques Tourneur

8:00 AM

THE MALTESE FALCON (1941): How do I love this movie, let me count the ways… In arguably the first, and greatest, film noir, hard-boiled detective Sam Spade (Humphrey Bogart) gets caught up in the deadly search for a priceless statue. Along the way he tangles with a murderous liar (Mary Astor), a foppish thug (Peter Lorre) and an obese mastermind (Sydney Greenstreet). Director John Huston brilliantly adapted it from the Dashiell Hammett novel and earned an Oscar nomination for Best Writing, Screenplay. The film also garnered nominations for Best Picture and for Sydney Greenstreet, in his film debut, Best Actor in a Supporting Role. Dir. John Huston

9:45 AM

THE BIG SLEEP (1946): In Howard Hawks' clever and sophisticated adaptation of Raymond Chandler's novel, private eye Philip Marlowe's (Humphrey Bogart) investigates the involvement of an opium addled (and nymphomaniacal) society girl (Martha Vickers) in the murder of a pornographer. He also has to determine if her sister (Lauren Bacall) is helping or hindering him. Dir. Howard Hawks

12:00 PM

SCARLET STREET (1945): A henpecked cashier and weekend painter, Christopher Cross (Edward G. Robinson), falls for heartless tramp Kitty (Joan Bennett) whom he meets by chance. She and her pimp/boyfriend Johnny (Dan Duryea) play the sucker for everything he has. Then Chris starts to embezzle to keep his lady love happy and things go from bad to worse. Dir. Fritz Lang

2:00 PM

JEOPARDY (1953): A suburban house wife (Barbara Stanwyck) on holiday in rural Mexico with her son and husband, desperately seeks help. Her husband is trapped in pilings on the shore of the ocean and the tide is coming in. She encounters an escaped criminal (Ralph Meeker) and will do anything in exchange for his aid. "How long has it been since you talked to a woman?" Dir. John Sturges

3:15 PM

ANGEL FACE (1953): An ambulance driver (Robert Mitchum) romances a beautiful but unstable woman (Jean Simons) who gets him a job as a chauffeur and promises him the capital to open his own garage. Murder and disaster follows. Mona Freeman plays the girlfriend he dumps for better things. Her reaction to his behavior, especially when he tries to come back to her, makes her character transcend the usual thankless good girl roles in noir. Dir. Otto Preminger

Friday, March 17, 11:15 AM

ODD MAN OUT (1947): In the aftermath of a botched hold-up, intended to finance the activities of his IRA cell, a wounded Johnny McQueen (James Mason) takes shelter in the back-alleys of Belfast, a shadowy underworld where sanctuary is freighted at every moment with peril. Meanwhile, a vast police manhunt is launched—a net that closes steadily, remorselessly in upon him. Dir. Carol Reed

Saturday, March 18, 12:45 PM

TOPAZ (1969): A complicated espionage thriller involving a Soviet spy in French General DeGaulle's retinue, drawn from Leon Uris's novel. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

Sunday, March 19, 1:00 AM

SHOCK CORRIDOR (1963): A reporter (Peter Breck) fakes insanity to crack a murder committed in an asylum. While there he meets a variety of inmates including a black man who's a white supremacist. He also finds himself at one point at the mercy of a group of nymphomaniacs. Dir. Samuel Fuller

NOIR ALLEY

Sunday, March 19

UPDATE: NOIR ALLEY will not be airing this weekend due to TCM's 48-hour tribute to Robert Osborne on March 18 and 19. NOIR ALLEY will return March 2767 with Tension (1949). Act of Violence, originally scheduled to air today, will run sometime in 2018. We hope that you will tune in this weekend and remember the wonderful contribution that Mr. Osborne made to TCM and classic film lovers.

Sunday, March 19, 11:15 AM

SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS (1957): A desperate press agent (Tony Curtis) stoops to new depths to help an egotistical columnist (Burt Lancaster) in an emotionally repugnant, but brilliant, performance, break up his sister's romance. Suitably noirish cinematography by James Wong Howe and an acidic script by Clifford Odets and Ernest Lehman combine with an excellent cast to deliver a remarkable film. Dir. Alexander Mackendrick

Monday, March 20, 4:15 AM

THE SEVENTH VICTIM (1943): A young woman (Kim Hunter) leaves school to investigate the disappearance of her beautiful and mysterious older sister (Jean Brooks). She finds out some interesting facts, one, her sister was married and two, she was part of a satanic set. The husband (Hugh Beaumont), a poet (Erford Gage) and a psychiatrist (Tom Conway) aid her search for the truth about her sister. Produced by horror icon Val Lewton. Dir. Mark Robson

Mon., March 20, 5:30 AM—9:00 AM

Criminal Lovers Double Feature

5:30 AM

BADLANDS (1973): After a charismatic James Dean wannabe (Martin Sheen) kills her dad, a baton-twirling teen (Sissy Spaceck) decides to join him on a shooting spree through Montana's badlands. It's loosely based on the Starkweather-Fugate killings of the 1950's which also inspired Bruce Springsteen's album Nebraska and the key back story in Peter Jackson's The Frighteners (1996). Dir. Terrence Malick

7:15 AM

THEY LIVE BY NIGHT (1949): Nicholas Ray's fiercely romantic noir about a young innocent, Farley Granger who gets mixed-up with hardened criminals and a violent escape after serving an unjust prison sentence. Cathy O'Donnell plays the girl who becomes his lover in an ill-fated romance. Dir. Nicholas Ray

Monday, March 20, 1:00 PM

THE LETTER (1940): Bette Davis gives a masterful performance as a married woman claiming self-defense in the murder of a fellow Britisher on her husband's rubber plantation in Malay. This succeeds both as a film noir and an incisive look into colonialism. Herbert Marshall gives a deeply empathetic performance as the loving husband. Watch for Victor Sen Yung as a solicitous lawyer's clerk. Dir. William Wyler

Mon., March 20, 5:00 PM—10:45 PM

Psychopathic Noir
Triple Bill

5:00 PM

PSYCHO (1960): Miriam Crane (Janet Leigh) impulsively embezzles $10,000 dollars from her employer and takes it on the lam. She checks into the Bates Motel, meets the queer but attractive Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins), takes a shower and makes cinematic history. A detective (Martin Balsam), Miriam's sister (Vera Miles) and her boyfriend (John Gavin) all arrive to look for the missing Miriam. Long time Hitchcock collaborator Bernard Herrmann created the rightfully legendary score. The immensely talented old time radio actress Virginia Gregg provides the voice of Norman's mother Norma Bates. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

7:00 PM

PEEPING TOM (1960): Voyeuristic cinematographer Mark (Karl Boehm) murders women as a result of a childhood spent as the guinea pig for his psychiatrist father's experiments in fear which the doctor filmed for prosperity. A budding romance with his sweet neighbor (Anna Massey), a children's book authoress, precipitates an emotional crisis for Mark. This classic film perfectly balances both horror and sympathy for the protagonist which along with the onscreen violence outraged critics of the time. Dir. Michael Powell

9:00 PM

THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER (1955): Bogus preacher Harry Powell (Robert Mitchum) marries an outlaw's widow (Shelly Winters in a stunning performance) in search of the dead man's hidden loot. The widow's son (Billy Chapin) sees through him, and tries to keep the secret of the treasure location and protect his mother, sister and himself from Powell. Lillian Gish plays the force of good in opposition to Mitchum's evil. Dir. Charles Laughton

Tues., March 21, 5:00 PM—2:30 AM

Film Noir Marathon

5:00 PM

DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944): Barbara Stanwyck—in a platinum blonde wig—plays Phyllis Dietrichson—the consummate femme fatale who lures insurance salesman and all around chump Walter Neff (Fred McMurray) into a plot involving murder and insurance fraud. His friend, and insurance adjuster, Barton Keyes (Edward G. Robinson) smells a rat. Nominated for seven Oscars: Best Actress in a Leading Role; Best Cinematography, Black-and-White; Best Director; Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture; Best Picture; Best Sound, Recording; and Best Writing, Screenplay. Dir. Billy Wilder

7:00 PM

DETOUR (1946): A hitchhiker (Tom Neal) takes on a dead man's identity only to face blackmail by an unscrupulous woman (Ann Savage) - possibly the meanest woman in the history of cinema. Dir. Edgar G. Ulmer

8:30 PM

CAPE FEAR (1962): Ex-convict, sex offender, and sociopath Max Caddy (Robert Mitchum) plots to destroy Sam Bowden (Gregory Peck) the district attorney who sent him to prison. Caddy wages a ruthless game of psychological warfare on Bowden, seemingly threatening Sam's wife (Polly Bergen) and 12 year old daughter without breaking any actual laws. Dir. J. Lee Thompson

10:30 PM

POINT BLANK (1967): Existential neo-noir at its best. Lee Marvin stars as a wraith like criminal out to get his share of the loot from a robbery after his partner shots him, leaves him for dead and absconds both with all the money and his wife. Angie Dickinson co-stars as his sympathetic sister-in-law who aids him. Dir. John Boorman

12:30 AM

WHITE HEAT (1949): "Top of the world, Ma!" a G-man (Edmond O'Brien) infiltrates a gang run by a mother-fixated psychotic, James Cagney in a stand out performance. This film marks the cinematic movement away from the traditional Warner Brothers' portrayal of the gangster to the more cynical and psychological film noir interpretation. Pointless trivia: Naked Gun 33 1/3 borrowed the plot. Dir. Raoul Walsh

Wednesday, March 22

You Only Hurt the One You Love Marathon

4:00 AM

THE BAD SEED (1956): "What will you give me for a basket of kisses?" Based on the stage play adapted from the brilliant novel by William March, Army wife Christine (Nancy Kelly) suspects that her seemingly perfect little girl Rhoda (Patty McCormack) is a ruthless killer. Eileen Heckart shines in her Oscar nominated supporting role as the alcoholic mother of one of Rhoda's victims. This truly terrifying film will make you look twice at all cute little blonde girls. Kelly and McCormack as well as cinematographer Harold Rosson were nominated for Oscars as well as Heckart. Dir. Mervyn LeRoy

6:30 AM

MILDRED PIERCE (1945): Joan Crawford won an Oscar for her performance as a woman who builds herself up from grass widow to successful restaurateur in a desperate effort to win the love of the most ungrateful brat in the history of cinema, her daughter Veda, brilliantly played by Ann Blyth. A marriage of convenience, adultery and murder ensue. At least Mildred has the greatest best friend ever, a wisecracking Eve Arden. Based on the James M. Cain story. Dir. Michael Curtiz

8:30 AM

GASLIGHT (1944): A newlywed (Ingrid Bergman) fears she's going mad when strange things start happening at the family mansion where her aunt was murdered ten years earlier. Joseph Cotten stars as the handsome stranger who aids her. Charles Boyer stars as the handsome husband who terrorizes her. The film won two Oscars, Best Actress in a Leading Role for Ingrid Bergman and Best Art Direction-Interior Decoration, Black-and-White for Cedric Gibbons, William Ferrari, Edwin B. Willis, Paul Huldschinsky, and earned five more nominations. Dir. George Cukor

10:45 AM

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE? (1962) A crazed, aging star (Bette Davis) torments her sister (Joan Crawford) in a decaying Hollywood mansion. This beautiful Hollywood gothic noir features a duet of superbly fearless performances by two legendary actresses. Nominated for five Oscars, but only one win, Best Costume Design, Black-and-White for Norma Koch Dir. Robert Aldrich

Wed., March 22, 9:15 PM—1:15 AM

Cops Gone Bad Double Bill

9:15 PM

TOUCH OF EVIL (1958): Orson Welles' masterpiece about a narcotics agent (Charlton Heston) who unintentionally put his wife (Janet Leigh) in grave danger when he investigates a crooked cop (Orson Welles). Utterly fantastic supporting performance by Marlene Dietrich as a Mexican Gypsy whore- no, really, I mean it. Dir. Orson Welles

11:15 PM

KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL (1952): Ex-con and floral delivery man Joe Rolfe (John Payne), journeys to Mexico to hunt down the gang of thieves that framed him for robbery and murder. The trio of baddies is superb: Neville Brand, Lee Van Cleef and Jack Elam. Dir. Phil Karlson

Thurs., March 23, 1:15 AM—5:45 AM

Murderous Lovers
Double Bill

1:15 AM

THE HONEYMOON KILLERS (1970): Con man Raymond Fernandez (Tony Lo Bianco) who seduces women steals their money and then abandons them meets his match when he tries his routine on Martha Beck (Shirley Stoler). She proves a master of manipulation and soon exerts an intense emotional control over him. She poses as his sister as he marries and defrauds a series of women; the pair eventually begins murdering their victims. Seems farfetched? The story is based on a real couple "The Lonely Hearts Killers" who operated in the 40s and were actually more ruthless. Dir. Leonard Kastle

3:30 AM

BONNIE AND CLYDE (1967): In this critically acclaimed and deeply influential classic, the legendary bank robbers and lovers (Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway) embark on a crime spree during the Depression era Dust Bowl of the 1930s and become folk heroes. The film won two Oscars, Estelle Parsons for Best Actress in a Support

Thurs., March 23, 7:15 AM—3:00 PM

Stranger Danger
Quadruple Feature

7:15 AM

KEY LARGO (1948): A returning veteran (Humphrey Bogart) tangles with a ruthless gangster (Edward G. Robinson) during a hurricane while falling for his dead war buddy's widow (Lauren Bacall). Claire Trevor steals the film with her Oscar winning performance as the gangster's alcoholic and emotionally abused girlfriend. Dir. John Huston

9:15 AM

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (1951): Childlike but charming psychopath Bruno (Robert Walker) suggests that he and Guy (Farley Granger), a tennis player with political ambitions, crisscross murders. Unfortunately, Guy realizes too late that Bruno wasn't joking. Guy's unwanted wife shows up murdered and he has no alibi. Screenplay by Raymond Chandler and Czenzi Ormonde. D.P. Robert Burks' outstanding work earned an Oscar nomination for Best Cinematography, Black-and-White. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

11:15 AM

THE THIRD MAN (1949): This fantastic film about a naive American, Joseph Cotten, investigating the death of his friend, Orson Welles, in post-World War II Vienna never loses its impact no matter how many times you watch it. "Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock". Director of Photography Robert Krasker won the Oscar for Best Cinematography, Black-and-White for the film. The film also garnered Oscar nominatio

1:00 PM

THE STRANGER (1946): A small-town schoolteacher (Loretta Young) encounters a determined investigator (Edward G. Robinson) who suspects her new husband (Orson Welles) may be an escaped Nazi war criminal. Can he convince her before it's too late? Dir. Orson Welles

Saturday, March 25, 3:15 AM

AFTER THE THIN MAN (1936): In this delightful follow up to The Thin Man, Nick (William Powell) and Nora (Myrna Loy) return to their home in San Francisco determined to rest up from their previous New York adventures, but Nora's snooty family unintentionally embroils them in a murder mystery. Joseph Calleia, Sam Levene, George Zucco and a young Jimmy Stewart add to the fun. Dir. W. S. Van Dyke

Saturday, March 25, 5:30 AM

SUDDENLY (1954): A gun hating war widow (Nancy Gates) finds her family and herself at the mercy or a ruthless hit man (Frank Sinatra). It seems that her house would be the perfect spot for his current job, assassinating the U. S. president who will be passing through her small town. Can the town's sheriff, and her ex-boyfriend, (Sterling Hayden) save them? Dir. Lewis Allen

Saturday, March 25, 12:45 PM

DIAL M FOR MURDER (1954): A man (Ray Milland) hires a friend to murder his wealthy wife (Grace Kelly). His plan goes awry when she stabs the would-be-murderer. Then he decides he can still get rid of her, by eroding erode her self-defense claim. Her ex-lover (Robert Cummings) tries to save her. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

Saturday, March 25, 2:45 PM

WAIT UNTIL DARK (1967): A commercial artist unknowingly brings a stash of heroin into his home. A trio of bad guys (Richard Crenna, Jack Weston and Alan Arkin) trace the dope to him. They trick him into leaving the house, but, unfortunately, his blind wife (Audrey Hepburn) is there alone. They proceed to first try to trick and then to terrorize her while she tries to figure out how to turn the tables on her unknown assailants. Hepburn earned an Oscar nomination for Best Actress for her remarkable performance. Adapted from the Broadway hit written by Fredrick Knott and directed by Arthur Penn. Dir. Terence Young

Sunday, March 26, 5:00 AM

LIFEBOAT (1944): In this bottle feature, seven survivors of a shipwreck must decide whether to trust the German member of the U-Boat that torpedoed their ship, and left them all stranded in a tiny lifeboat, as he is the only one among them with seafaring skills. The moral calculations each must make motor this thriller to a satisfying conclusion. Dir. Alfred Hitchcock.

NOIR ALLEY

Sunday, March 26, 7:00 AM

FNF Prez Eddie Muller presents

TENSION (1950): A cuckolded husband (Richard Basehart) plans the perfect murder in order to kill his wife's lover. Then he finds true love with an understanding neighbor (Cyd Charisse) and decides against implementing his plot. Unfortunately, he becomes the prime suspect when somebody else kills his previously intended victim. Audrey Totter shines as his devious mate. Dir. John Berry

Sunday, March 26, 9:00 AM

THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (1956): A family vacationing in Morocco accidentally stumble on to an assassination plot and the conspirators are determined to prevent them from interfering. Jay Livingston and Ray Evans garnered the Oscar for Best Music, Original Song for the film's song "Whatever Will Be, Will Be (Que Sera, Sera)".Dir. Alfred Hitchcock

Wed., March 29, 5:30 AM—5:00 PM

Noir Marathon

Call in sick and unplug your phone.

5:30 AM

THE ARNELO AFFAIR (1947): A neglected wife, Frances Gifford, gets mixed up with an homme fatale, John Hodiak. When she tries to break it off, he threatens to implicate her in the murder of his girlfriend. This is a rare cinematic outing by master old time radio writer-producer Arch Oboler. Dir. Arch Oboler

7:00 AM

THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE (1946): In this noir classic, illicit lovers (John Garfield and Lana Turner) plot to kill the woman's older husband. She wants to own her own restaurant, the eternal ambition of heroines created by James M. Cain, author of the original novel. The producers managed to stay quite faithful to the book while excising the sado-masochistic nature of the character's sexual relationship. Dir. Tay Garnett

9:00 AM

NORA PRENTIS (1947): In this noir tale, a decorous doctor becomes obsessed with a beautiful nightclub singer, (Ann Sheridan). Interestingly, uber straight man Kent Smith, best known as Irina's husband in Val Lewton's Cat People (1942) (Dir. Jacques Tourner) gets the chance to play a man who will stop at nothing to possess the object of his desire. Dir. Vincent Sherman

11:00 AM

THE UNFAITHFUL (1947): Pulp writer David Goodis penned the screenplay for this clever reworking of Somerset Maughn's The Letter. A married woman (Ann Sheridan) kills a man in self-defense. Her lawyer (Lew Ayres) soon discovers the murdered man was the woman's lover. The story transcends its noirish trappings, to reveal a fine drama about war time marriage and infidelity. Highly recommended. Dir. Vincent Sherman

1:00 PM

DECEPTION (1946): Pianist Christine Radcliffe (Bette Davis) tries to protect her refugee husband (Paul Henreid) from her rich and powerful ex-lover, composer Alexander Hollenius (Claude Rains). Dir. Irving Rapper

3:00 PM

DEAD RINGER (1964): In this late era noir, Bette Davis stars as twins, the rich and mean Margaret and the other poor and put upon spinster Edith meet after many years at the funeral of Margaret's husband Frank. Edith snaps when she discovers from Margaret why Frank dumped her and married Margaret instead. Edith shoots her sister, takes her place and tries to make "Edith's" death look like a suicide. Edith's boyfriend, police sergeant Jim Hobbson (Karl Malden) and Margaret's lover Tony (Peter Lawford) soon complicates things. Dir. Paul Henreid

Friday, March 31, 3:00 AM—5:00 PM

TCM Salutes Joan Crawford

Here are the noirs...

10:45 AM

A WOMAN'S FACE (1941): The soon to be queen of the noirs, Joan Crawford, starred in this suspenseful drama as a facially scarred blackmailer who's given a new outlook on life after plastic surgery. Can she adjust to a normal life and stop her ex-accomplice's nefarious plan to murder his nephew? Dir. George Cukor

12:45 PM

HUMORESQUE (1946): Noirish romance about an equally talented and narcissistic classical musician (John Garfield) from the New York slums who falls in love with wealthy neurotic (Joan Crawford) with expectedly problematic results. Crawford's performance as a self-destructive alcoholic raises the level of the film beyond its melodramatic script. Dir. Jean Negulesco

3:00 PM

POSSESSED (1947): In this excellent examination of obsession, Joan Crawford gives a terrific—and Oscar nominated—performance as a married woman whose passion for a former love (Van Heflin) drives her mad. Raymond Massey plays her compassionate husband. Dir. Curtis Bernhardt

Friday, March 31, 5:00 PM—3:00 AM

TCM Salutes Noir Icon Dan Duryea

Here are the noirs...

6:45 PM

THE UNDERWORLD STORY (1950): The classic noir stars Dan Dureya as Mike Reese, an unethical journalist turned newspaper publisher who becomes involved in creating the news and not just writing it when there's a murder case involving another publisher (Herbert Marshall). Mike starts out doing what's best for him, but when an innocent African-American maid is framed, he starts to waver in pursuing his self-interests. Dir. Cy Endfield

10:30 PM

SCARLET STREET (1945): A henpecked cashier and weekend painter, Christopher Cross (Edward G. Robinson), falls for heartless tramp Kitty (Joan Bennett) whom he meets by chance. She and her pimp/boyfriend Johnny (Dan Duryea) play the sucker for everything he has. Then Chris starts to embezzle to keep his lady love happy and things go from bad to worse. Dir. Fritz Lang

Eddie Muller presents NOIR ALLEY

FNF Prez Eddie Muller hosts the new TCM series NOIR ALLEY every Sunday morning at 7 AM PST.

Kim Novak with Alfred Hitchcock on the set of Vertigo screening March 1

Noir thriller Wait until Dark screens March 2

Davis v. Crawford in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? on March 2

"Top of the world" Cagney + stellar cast in White Heat on March 3

Hitchcock's final film, Family Plot, on March 4

Eddie Muller presents The Maltese Falcon on NOIR ALLEY March 5

Hitchcock's spectacular spy-thriller Saboteur on March 5

Van Heflin and Barbara Stanwyck in East Side West Side on March 7

Cyd Charise and Robert Taylor in Party Girl on March 8

Dick Powell stars in Murder, My Sweet on March 10

William Powell and Myrna Loy in The Thin Man on March 10

Spencer Tracy and Robert Ryan in Bad Day at Black Rock on March 10

Actor/director Robert Montgomery's Lady in the Lake on March 10

Farley Granger and John Dahl v. Jimmy Stewart in Hitchock's Rope on March 10

Eddie Muller presents Detour on NOIR ALLEY on March 12

Roy Scheider and Gene Hackman in The French Connection on March 14

Tourneur's quintessential noir Out of the Past screens March 15

Scarlet Street starring Joan Bennett, Dan Duryea and Edward G. Robinson on March 15

James Mason in Caarol Reed's Odd Man Out on March 17

Hitchcock's spy thriller Topaz on March 18

Samuel Fuller's Shock Corridor on March 19

Eddie Muller presents Act of Violence on NOIR ALLEY on March 19

Tony Curtis and Burt Lancaster in Sweet Smell of Success on March 19

Jean Brooks flees a satanic cult in Val Lewton's The Seventh Victim screening March 20

Farley Granger and Cathy O'Donnell in They Live by Night on March 20

Bette Davis in The Letter on March 20

Michael Powell's Peeping Tom on March 20

Angie Dickinson and Lee Marvin in Point Blank on March 21

Mildred Pierce screens March 22

Phil Karlson's Kansas City Confidential on March 22

Shirley Stoler and Tony Lo Bianco in The Honeymoon Killers on March 23

Edward G. Robinson in Orson Welle's The Stranger on March 23

Powell and Loy reunite for After the Thin Man screening March 25

Frank Sinatra and Nancy Gates in Lewis Allen's thriller Suddenly on March 25

Hitchcock's Dial M for Murder on March 25

Tallulah Bankhead and John Hodiak in Hitchcock's Lifeboat on March 26

Eddie Muller presents Tension on NOIR ALLEY on March 26

Hitchcock's The Man Who Knew Too Much on March 26

Lew Ayres and Ann Sheridan in The Unfaithful on March 26

George Cuckor directs Joan Crawford in A Woman's Face on March 31

Joan Crawford and Van Heflin in Possessed on March 31

Cy Enfield's The Underworld Story starring Dan Dureya on March 31

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